LA Grimm

On the left side of the circle

eordancing:

Dining Room by La Branĉaro on Flickr.
postscrip:

Coonley House

“Literature is a luxury; fiction is a necessity.”

—   G.K. Chesterton (via libraryland)

“I am I, and I wish I wasn’t”

—   Bernard Marx - Brave New World by Aldous Huxley (via stay-golden-beautiful)

(via libraryland)

Adding a Colorful Gloss to a Black-and-White World

A new exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery shows the famous of by-gone decades in a way they normally are not seen:  in vibrant color.  

life:

Five decades later, the assassination of John F. Kennedy remains one of the few utterly signal events from the second half of the 20th century. Other moments — some thrilling (the moon landing, the fall of the Berlin Wall), others horrifying (the killings of Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert Kennedy, the Challenger explosion) — have secured their places in the history books and, even more indelibly, in the memories of those who witnessed them. But nothing in the latter part of “the American century” defined an era as profoundly as those rifle shots that split the warm Dallas air on November 22, 1963, and the sudden death of the 46-year-old president.
Here, on the 45th anniversary of JFK’s March 1967 reinterment, when his remains were moved from his initial resting place to the permanent grave site and memorial at Arlington, LIFE.com offers a gallery of photographs (some of them never before published) from the deeply fraught funeral held mere days after Kennedy was killed.
While both ceremonies — the state funeral in ’63, and the reinterment three-and-a-half years later — were marked by sorrow, the rawness of the emotion evident in 1963 is still striking, and rending, today.

life:

Five decades later, the assassination of John F. Kennedy remains one of the few utterly signal events from the second half of the 20th century. Other moments — some thrilling (the moon landing, the fall of the Berlin Wall), others horrifying (the killings of Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert Kennedy, the Challenger explosion) — have secured their places in the history books and, even more indelibly, in the memories of those who witnessed them. But nothing in the latter part of “the American century” defined an era as profoundly as those rifle shots that split the warm Dallas air on November 22, 1963, and the sudden death of the 46-year-old president.

Here, on the 45th anniversary of JFK’s March 1967 reinterment, when his remains were moved from his initial resting place to the permanent grave site and memorial at Arlington, LIFE.com offers a gallery of photographs (some of them never before published) from the deeply fraught funeral held mere days after Kennedy was killed.

While both ceremonies — the state funeral in ’63, and the reinterment three-and-a-half years later — were marked by sorrow, the rawness of the emotion evident in 1963 is still striking, and rending, today.

doubledaybooks:

The Vanishers by Heidi Julavits: Psychics do battle from famous chairs.
(Also a clue for our competition post from earlier today…)

doubledaybooks:

The Vanishers by Heidi Julavits: Psychics do battle from famous chairs.

(Also a clue for our competition post from earlier today…)

Dickens’s Victorian London is a collection of 19th-century photographs which has been published to coincide with the 200th anniversary of Charles Dickens’s birth.

1. A view of the Strand around 1890, taken from in front of St Mary le Strand. On the left is Somerset House, where Dickens’s father John worked as a clerk for the Navy Pay Office.

2. Lower Fore Street, a narrow cobblestoned street in Lambeth, pictured in 1865. This industrial area became very densely populated over the Victorian period; its inhabitants rose from 28,000 in 1801 to nearly 300,000 by the time this photograph was taken.

3. This picture shows St John’s Gate, the gateway to what was once the priory of the Knights of St John. By the 18th century, it housed the offices of the publishers of the Gentleman’s Magazine.

(Source: sunrec, via libraryland)

“Did you know that for pretty much the entire history of the human species, the average life span was less than thirty years? You could count on ten years or so of real adulthood, right? There was no planning for retirement, There was no planning for a career. There was no planning. No time for plannning. No time for a future. But then the life spans started getting longer, and people started having more and more future. And now life has become the future. Every moment of your life is lived for the future—you go to high school so you can go to college so you can get a good job so you can get a nice house so you can afford to send your kids to college so they can get a good job so they can get a nice house so they can afford to send their kids to college.”

—   John Green, Paper Towns (via libraryland)

“Passing tests doesn’t begin to compare with searching and inquiring and pursuing topics that engage us and excite us. That’s far more significant than passing tests and, in fact, if that’s the kind of educational career you’re given the opportunity to pursue, you will remember what you discovered.”

—   Noam Chomsky on the purpose of education. (via explore-blog)

(Source: , via libraryland)